Now What Does This Mean ?

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  • George Bellefontaine
    Moderator Emeritus
    • Jan 2001
    • 7637

    Now What Does This Mean ?

    New technology always fascinates me, but sometimes it takes a while for it to sink in, so I'll just touch briefly on an article I read in the December Widescreen Review and hope I get it right.
    To quote the article,"a revolutionary optical media technology with stellar capacities", whew.
    It's called FMD(fluorescent multilayer disc) and was developed by a team of scientists in the mid 1990s, who after realizing what they had, formed a company called Constallation 3D,Inc., to commercialize their invention.
    It's digital storage taken to a limit that's hard to comprehend. Imagine a disc the sze of a dvd with a storage capacity of more than 400GB, and a read/write speed above 100 million bits per second.
    Compare that 400GB to today's dvd maximum of 18GB (DVD18)which is rarely used due to complexities and cost, or to the more commonly used DVD9 with its 8.5GB of storage on two layers.
    The article goes on about how the new technology not only affects the future of dvds, but just about anything with digital storage.But what does that really mean for we dvd folk? Well for one thing it would mean high res capabilities, and then you could have hours of extras, less compression of the soundtracks, etc. Sounds great ,doesn't it.
    But if they build it, will they ( the studios) come ? Considering their paranoia about piracy and what have you, it's not likely we'll see much here for some time to come.
    Still it's wonderful to imagine dvd as good as film.




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  • Andrew Pratt
    Moderator Emeritus
    • Aug 2000
    • 16507

    #2
    Sounds like an ideal medium for TiVO's etc. Not sure about replacing DVD anytime soon but anythings possible I guess




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    • John Holmes
      Moderator Emeritus
      • Aug 2000
      • 2703

      #3
      This could be good and bad. My big issue would be not to make what movies I own obsolete. If we can enjoy the new technology and it be backwards compatible then I'm in. I own way too many movies to start from scratch again.




      "I came here, to chew bubble gum and kickass. And I'm all out of bubble gum!!!" My DVD's
      "I have come here, to chew bubblegum and kickass. And I'm all out of bubblegum!!!"

      Comment

      • George Bellefontaine
        Moderator Emeritus
        • Jan 2001
        • 7637

        #4
        John,
        That would be a BIG issue with me,too.There's no way I could ever afford to replace my collection with high res copies, so the technology would have to be backward compatible for me.




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        • Lex
          Moderator Emeritus
          • Apr 2001
          • 27461

          #5
          Well, I have always wanted a stack of 350 coasters, lol. Interesting technology...

          Lex
          Doug
          "I'm out there Jerry, and I'm loving every minute of it!" - Kramer

          Comment

          • GregoriusM
            Super Senior Member
            • Oct 2000
            • 2755

            #6
            I've read four or five articles on this technology, and apparently new players can fairly easily be made to read both current DVD's and the new media and within a decent price range.
            .
            Gregor

            Comment

            • John Holmes
              Moderator Emeritus
              • Aug 2000
              • 2703

              #7
              Did any of the articles mention a possible street date?




              "I came here, to chew bubble gum and kickass. And I'm all out of bubble gum!!!" My DVD's
              "I have come here, to chew bubblegum and kickass. And I'm all out of bubblegum!!!"

              Comment

              • GregoriusM
                Super Senior Member
                • Oct 2000
                • 2755

                #8
                2 to 5 years, depending upon the application, which is everything from archival backup to AV media.
                .
                Gregor

                Comment

                • Uncle Clive
                  Former Moderator
                  • Jan 2002
                  • 919

                  #9
                  Just the same way Manufactors adapted the technoloy fairly quickly to build DVD units that can read MP3 encoded discs, I hope it will be the same for this new tech.

                  It would be nuts to think that we can just discard our DVDs and/or use them as vertical Blinds!!

                  Hey, hey, now wouldn't that be a good Idea for HGTV!? ^_^




                  CLIVE




                  HEY!! Why buy movie tickets when you can own a Theater?
                  CLIVE




                  HEY!! Why buy movie tickets when you can own a Theater?

                  Comment

                  • rlabarge
                    Member
                    • Jan 2001
                    • 67

                    #10
                    FMD technology has been around for a few years. I actually saw a demonstration of it about four years ago. There are a few problems with it that have prevented it from making a serious run at become a mainstream product.

                    (1) The developers have never been able to bring the technology from a "lab" phase to a "real product" phase. In short no real commercial products have ever been released using this technology.

                    (2) Since most of the established consumer electronics companies dont hold any of the underlying FMD technology patents, they have no incentive to switch from laser optics to a new technology. Why change to a new technology when you are getting significant royalties from an existing, and successful technology.

                    (3) Finally the next generation of DVD technology, which will use a blue laser instead of an infrared laser, will offer at least 4 times more capacity than current DVD discs. Blue lasers have been working for several years, and could be incorporated into HD-DVD players quite easily.

                    I do hope that FMD finds a way to succeed in the market, but I doubt that it will be used to make products that replace DVD players any time soon.




                    Ralph LaBarge
                    Managing Partner, Alpha DVD
                    Author, "DVD Authoring & Production"
                    rlabarge@alphadvd.com
                    Ralph LaBarge
                    Managing Partner, Alpha DVD
                    Author, "DVD Authoring & Production"
                    rlabarge@alphadvd.com

                    Comment

                    • George Bellefontaine
                      Moderator Emeritus
                      • Jan 2001
                      • 7637

                      #11
                      Very intersting,Ralph. Thanks for the update on this new technology.
                      George




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