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RedStep
08-17-2003, 07:49 PM
Can we talk TV...I did a search and found everyone talking another language. I was wanting to know about HDTV, RPTV, Plasmas. What should one look for when in the market??? What are some basics I should familarize myself with??? What are some specs???
If this is to lame a question delete it...




RedStep
We are truly a product of the decisions we make

Kevin P
08-18-2003, 11:11 AM
There's no such thing as a lame question. :)

When shopping for a TV you need to ask yourself a few questions: How big a screen do you want? What is your budget? What will fit in your room? What are you going to watch on it? (DVD? Cable? Satellite? HDTV?) Are you a critical viewer (e.g. HT movie enthusiast) or a more casual cable TV viewer?Since you're asking about RPTV and plasmas you're probably looking at 16:9 aspect (widescreen) displays in the 40-60" size range, am I correct?

RPTV (which stands for Rear Projection Television) utilizes a projection system inside a box with a mirror and a screen. Most RPTVs use CRT technology, with separate tubes for red, green, and blue, which are aligned to produce a full-color image on the screen. Some RPTVs use LCD or DLP technology--these use a high intensity bulb and a digital panel to generate the image, which is projected onto the screen. RPTVs tend to be bulky; most are over 20 inches in depth, which can be a limiting factor in certain rooms. RPTV is the cheapest way to get into a "big screen" (more than 36-40" diagonal), with a lot of sets ringing in at under $2000 now.

Plasma sets have a flat screen with a fixed array of pixels (color dots) that form the image. The main advantage of plasma is the thin profile, typically 4 inches in depth, meaning a plasma screen can be hung on a wall. The big drawback of plasma is the cost. Cheap 32-inch plasmas run around $3000 or so, and the larger, higher-resolution displays can run over $10,000. Also, some of the cheaper plasmas may not have sufficient resolution (number of pixels) to display HDTV at full resolution.

Other technologies to consider are direct-view CRT and front projection. Direct-view CRT is what your typical television set uses. Typically these max out at 36" diagonal, though Sony has an expensive, and very heavy 40" Wega direct-view. Front projection (FP or FPTV) uses a separate projector and screen, and is commonly used in home theaters to get an image size of 80-120 inches or more. FP is most suitable in a room that can be made completely, or almost completely, dark.

If you have any other questions, feel free to respond. But if you could ask yourself the questions I posted at the beginning, it will help you in deciding what kind of display is best suited for your needs and budget.

KJP




Official Computer Geek and Techno-Wiz Guru of HTGuide - Visit Tower of Power (http://www.htguide.com/CFBoards/index.cfm?fuseaction=Threads.listings&forum=12&CFB=1)
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RedStep
08-18-2003, 06:35 PM
Thx KP, Great Post...
I have a nice console w/limited space for my TV (36"max) So there ya go, no big screen, no RPTV. I do wonder about HDTV, aren't some HDTV and some HDTV compatable???
I want the best 36" direct view CRT(tube???) I can get HDTV...going to watch DVD's & digital from satellite...critical viewer, and I don't want to have to replace it in a few years.




RedStep
We are truly a product of the decisions we make

Kevin P
08-19-2003, 12:15 PM
Sounds like you would be happy with a 36" Sony Wega HDTV-ready set, if it fits in your console.

Here's a couple of 36" HDTV-ready flat-screen direct view TVs: Sony KV-36HS510 Wega (http://www.crutchfield.com/cgi-bin/S-4FwrsfrgAph/ProdView.asp?s=0&c=6&g=11420&I=15836HS510&o=m&a=0&cc=01&avf=N), Toshiba 36HF73 (http://www.crutchfield.com/cgi-bin/S-4FwrsfrgAph/ProdView.asp?s=0&c=6&g=11420&I=05236HF73&o=m&a=0&cc=01&avf=N)

If you want a 34" widescreen, here's the Sony KV-34XBR910 Wega (http://www.crutchfield.com/cgi-bin/S-4FwrsfrgAph/ProdView.asp?s=0&c=6&g=11420&I=15834XB910&o=m&a=0&cc=01&avf=N), or the Toshiba 34HF83 (http://www.crutchfield.com/cgi-bin/S-4FwrsfrgAph/ProdView.asp?s=0&c=6&g=11420&I=05234HF83&o=m&a=0&cc=01&avf=N). There are countless others I imagine, I just found these on Crutchfield.com.




Official Computer Geek and Techno-Wiz Guru of HTGuide - Visit Tower of Power (http://www.htguide.com/CFBoards/index.cfm?fuseaction=Threads.listings&forum=12&CFB=1)
My HT Site (http://www.patzcatz.com/ht.html)

Cam McFarland
08-05-2004, 07:43 PM
What about cable HDTV converter suggestions, anyone??

aud19
08-05-2004, 07:49 PM
Usually you're at the mercy of the cable company in that situation Cam. Like they used to say, you can have any colour as long as it's black :lol:

Jason

Cam McFarland
08-05-2004, 10:16 PM
Usually you're at the mercy of the cable company in that situation Cam. Like they used to say, you can have any colour as long as it's black :lol:

Jason

Are we talking about the same thing??

I am refering to the aftermarket box for
an HD ready TV, in order to get the High def
audio & video.

JonMarsh
08-05-2004, 10:29 PM
You're talking about an OTA Tuner. Over The Air....

Some now come with a slot for the new cable cards, but not all cable vendors support this yet.

OTA means you need an antenna, depending on where you are, out doors may be required. Now that the FCC and cable companies have agreed on standards, it will be much easier to get HD cable service in the future- at least in theory.

Note, an OTA tuner won't usually work with cable, because they use different modulation techniques. If you do need to work with your cable vendor, these days they usually supply their own box which will output DVI or component.

~Jon

Cam McFarland
08-05-2004, 10:33 PM
Thanks Jon,

I have been trying to figure that stuff out.... :??

aud19
08-06-2004, 11:28 AM
Yes sorry, you asked for cable HDTV box solutions so I assumed you meant HDTV via your cable provider, not OTA. Some companies have 1-2 boxes to choose from (one might have PVR capabilities etc) but other than that your pretty much stuck with what they offer. I believe Motorola supplies most companies equipment.

Jason

Shane Martin
08-06-2004, 01:28 PM
Some companies have 1-2 boxes to choose from (one might have PVR capabilities etc) but other than that your pretty much stuck with what they offer. I believe Motorola supplies most companies equipment
Cable card is fixing this. Motorola, Scientific Atlanta are the 2 big ones out there for cable boxes.

Cam McFarland
08-06-2004, 01:43 PM
thanks guys.........

aud19
08-06-2004, 02:39 PM
Well "fixing" might be a bit of a stretch. At this point cable cards won't work for PPV or any other on demand service and that's on the limited amount of hardware that even supports cable cards. It's very promising but it's also something that's very much in it's infancy still.

Jason